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LISA MACCARLEY, LOS ANGELES PROBATE AND CONSERVATORSHIP ATTORNEY, TO BE FEATURED ON CNN’S SPECIAL REPORT

“TOXIC: BRITNEY SPEARS’ BATTLE FOR FREEDOM”

http://Bettyshope.com

LOS ANGELES, CA (September 24, 2021) — Lisa MacCarley, a California Probate and Conservatorship Attorney and Executive Director of the newly-formed non-profit Bettys’ Hope, will be featured on CNN’s Special Report “Toxic: Britney Spears’ Battle for Freedom,” to air Sunday, September 26, 2021 at 5 p.m. PT and 8 p.m. ET and will re-air on October 3, 2021 at 6 p.m. PT and 9 p.m. ET.  The Special Report explores the pop star’s legal battle over her toxic conservatorship which has garnered attention around the world. The #FreeBritney movement has even inspired legislators in both Sacramento and Washington, D.C. to take up the cause of guardianship and conservatorship abuse.

In Ms. MacCarley’s interview, she talks about the dysfunctional nature of Los Angeles County conservatorships and provides expert analysis on what went wrong for Britney Spears at the inception of her toxic conservatorship. The CNN Special comes just days before the September 29th hearing where L.A. County Presiding Probate Court Judge Brenda Penny will decide whether to grant Jamie Spears’ petition to terminate Britney’s 13-year conservatorship. 

Attorney MacCarley fully expects that Britney will be granted whatever she requests, stating, “After being in a conservatorship that started with violations of Ms. Spears’ constitutional rights for over 13 years, I believe that the Court is mandated to dissolve the conservatorship as soon as possible. In all likelihood, Ms. Spears will walk out of this hearing with the legal ability to make decisions for herself about her career, finances, medical treatment, her prenuptial agreement, and other legal matters.” 

Lisa MacCarley has been an advocate for guardianship and conservatorship reform for several years. Her support for the #FreeBritney resulted from her observation of numerous heartbreaking cases for far less – famous people. Ms. MacCarley has also  appeared on the BBC Select Special, “The Battle for Britney: Fans, Cash and a Conservatorship,” which aired on May 11, 2021, and she has been widely – interviewed for her legal opinion by media, worldwide. 

“Britney Spears’ toxic conservatorship didn’t happen in a vacuum,” states MacCarley. “It happened due to a dysfunctional court system that has been ignored by journalists and politicians until recently. I could not be more grateful for the attention that this problem is finally garnering. We are on the precipice of the Baby Boomers reaching 80 years old, and now is time to focus on what is going wrong in probate courts all over the nation. On that note, I am grateful to have been sought out by CNN news journalist Chloe Melas and her team to talk about Britney’s conservatorship and why it was unjust from the very beginning.” 

Ms. MacCarley hopes that the attention Ms. Spears’ case has produced will shine a light on the changes that she believes are needed for a more just, fair, and humane probate court system.

Ms. MacCarley is available to speak to members of the press and can be reached at: (818) 249-1200 or LisaMacCarley@gmail.com or visit: http://lisamaccarley.com.  

Twitter @lisamaccarley; IG @lisamaccarley

To learn more about Bettys’ Hope, please visit: http://www.BettysHope.com (Facebook: BettysHope).

I WRITE IN MY SLEEP

I don’t know how many times I have used the expression, “It’s so easy, I could do it in my sleep,”?  Well for me – it’s true: I often write in my sleep.

Sometimes it’s a continuation of projects I’m working on for clients – blogs, memoirs or a book I’m ghostwriting. Other times, it’s not the actual writing that I’m doing in my dream; it’s about me quoting a rate for a project or following up with someone who asked me to work with them previously. In each of these instances, work does not end when I turn out the light and go to sleep, but rather, continues into the different stages of the sleep cycle when my creative thoughts are swirling around in my head.

I believe this process is very common for those in the arts. I remember Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones mentioning that he often came out of dreams with songs already partially written. It was during the dream state that ideas would come to him for melodies or riffs and he would pull out his tape player and put it down on tape in the middle of the night, then go back to sleep.

Another things that I sometimes find myself doing is typing keys on my imaginary keyboard when I’m asleep. I’ve been told that my fingers move and I’ve also woken myself up doing this. Rather than this being a nervous impulse, I think it’s, again, related to what I’m dreaming about.

The late, great Stevie Ray Vaughn used to play guitar in his sleep, according to one of the biographies I read about him. He was known for practicing all the time and sleeping with his guitar next to him in bed, so that if he wanted to work out some new instrumentation in the middle of the night, he could do so without much effort.

I’ve always been able to remember my dreams – often with great detail. I’m fortunate in that this process helps me sort things out that I’m trying to resolve. Sometimes, it provides the seeds of creativity for a project, while other times, it enables me to work out complex feelings.

In last night’s dream, I was writing a blog for a former client and it was a good one, from what I can recollect. Why was I writing this blog for a former client? I have no idea. I haven’t spoken to her in a long time and I don’t recall thinking about her recently.

Does everyone act out in their dreams what they do for work? Do our dreams actually have meaning, or are they just projections of stress that we are creativity trying to sort out?  Are our dreams filled with meaning, or are they made up of random thoughts?

You decide.